Mental Health Facts in today's society

How common are mental health problems?

  • 1 in 4 people will experience a mental health problem of some kind each year in England .

  • 1 in 6 people report experiencing a common mental health problem (like anxiety and depression) in any given week in England.

Are mental health problems increasing?

The overall number of people reporting mental health problems has been going up in recent years.

  • The amount of people with common mental health problems went up by 20% between 1993 to 2014, in both men and women.

  • The percentage of people reporting severe mental health symptoms in any given week rose from 7% in 1993, to over 9% in 2014.

  • The number of young women reporting common mental health problems has been going up.

Who’s most affected by mental health problems?

Anyone can get a mental health problem. But we know that some groups are more likely to get them than others.

These include:

  • People who identify as LGBTIQ+. LGBTIQ+ people are between 2–3 times more likely than heterosexual people to report having a mental health problem in England.

  • Black or Black British people. 23% of Black or Black British people will experience a common mental health problem in any given week. This compares to 17% of White British people.

  • Young women aged 16-24. Over a quarter (26%) of young women aged between 16–24 years old report having a common mental health problem in any given week. This compares to 17% of adults. And this number has been going up.

  • Around 40% of people in England who have overlapping problems including homelessness, substance misuse and contact with the criminal justice system in any given year also have a mental health problem. (This is sometimes called facing ‘multiple disadvantage’.)

Mental health does not discriminate anyone can be affected.

 

Mental health is as important and as valid as a physical condition

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